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Article
August 1950

ROLE OF STELLATE BLOCK IN VARIOUS INTRACRANIAL PATHOLOGIC STATES

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Division of Neurologic Surgery, University of California School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1950;61(2):286-293. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250020290010
Abstract

THE ROLE played by vasospasm in vascular disease is receiving increasing attention from surgeons dealing with peripheral circulatory disturbances. That cerebral vasospasm may be equally important in various intracranial pathologic states is not widely accepted,1 and as a consequence comparatively little attention has been directed toward an effective means of overcoming such spasm in instances in which it presumably is a causal factor of clinical importance.

It is probable that this lag in interest in cerebral vasopasm stems largely from the earlier physiologic concept that the cerebral circulation is influenced chiefly by extracranial factors such as the systemic blood pressure, the carotid sinus and other reflex mechanisms.2 It is now generally recognized, however, that in addition to these obviously important extracranial influences there are significant intracranial mechanisms which affect the cerebral circulation. In brief, these are the carbon dioxide and oxygen tension of the arterial blood supplying the

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