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Article
September 1950

EXCRETORY UROGRAPHY VERSUS RETROGRADE UROGRAPHYA Ureteral Compression Technic

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1950;61(3):568-582. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250020573016
Abstract

IT IS NOT the purpose of this paper to exploit the advantages and possibilities of each method of urography but rather to evaluate honestly the indications and contraindications for each. Braasch1 summarized the matter well when he stated: "Although excretory and retrograde urography have individual advantages, they frequently are of complementary value and may be combined to good effect." We are in complete accord with this statement.

To Binz2 goes the credit for having synthesized the iodine compound, which he called selectan neutral, that heralded the advent of excretory urography. Von Lichtenberg3 was one of the first to use this substance clinically and to realize its possibilities. In his opinion, the compound called uroselectan (sodium iodomethamate), which also was synthesized by Binz and was similar to selectan neutral except that it contained less iodine and was more soluble, was even more adaptable for use in intravenous urography

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