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Article
November 1950

EFFECTIVENESS OF SOAPS CONTAINING HEXACHLOROPHENE FOR THE SURGICAL SCRUBSpecial Reference to Bar Soap

Author Affiliations

OMAHA
From the departments of surgery and bacteriology, University of Nebraska College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1950;61(5):869-880. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250020877008
Abstract

THE COMPOUND hexachlorophene (2,2'-dihydroxy-3,5,6-3',5'6'-hexachlorodiphenyl-methane) frequently referred to as G-11 or AT-7 and incorporated into liquid soap, has been studied extensively as an effective bactericidal agent in reducing the numbers of bacterial flora of the human skin. The studies on liquid soaps by Traub and his co-workers1 in 1944 and 1945, by Clark and others2 in 1947 and by Price and his colleagues3 in 1948 are informative and convincing. Seastone and Erickson4 made valuable studies and in 1949 compared the liquid and bar soaps as vehicles for hexachlorophene in the surgical scrub. Nungester, Thirlby and Vial5 in 1949 evaluated a bar soap containing this formula and concluded that a three minute scrub with such a soap was superior to the usual 10 minute surgical scrub.

In spite of these excellent studies, it was difficult for our group at the University Hospital to accept this rather radical

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