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Article
December 1950

RUPTURES OF SURFACE BLOOD VESSELS ON CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES AS A CAUSE OF SUBDURAL HEMORRHAGE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in the City of New York.

AMA Arch Surg. 1950;61(6):992-1006. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250021002002
Abstract

SUBDURAL hemorrhage from the rupture a blood vessel on the surface of a cerebral hemisphere is a well recognized entity which has received attention in the literature principally because of its reputed role in the production of chronic subdural hematoma. Putnam,1 Rand,2 Jelsma,3 Baker,4 Leary5 and many others have concerned themselves with this question. Only cursory consideration, however, has been given to the actual vascular rupture; its anatomic nature and the mechanism of its production have not been adequately studied or clearly defined. The following discussion is an attempt to assess the nature and significance of these lesions.

This study is based on 102 autopsies which were carried out in the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in New York city from December 1940 to July 1949. In the list are included cases of fatal subdural hemorrhages produced by ruptures of surface blood vessels on the cerebral hemispheres and

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