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Article
February 1951

BONE BRIDGING WITH OPPOSING MASSIVE HEMICYLINDRICAL GRAFTS

Author Affiliations

MUSCATINE, IOWA

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;62(2):284-291. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250030289010
Abstract

There have been numerous methods used in bridging large bone defects. A review of the literature shows as many different technics as authors writing articles.1 Oscar L. Miller states: "All types, kinds, and sizes of grafts have had their supporters. Operations have succeeded and failed for each other."2

It is well known that the success of a bone graft depends on many factors; some are known and some remain a veritable mystery. Success may occur when the odds are prohibitive and failure ensue in cases appearing to be ideal for grafting. There are, however, three basic procedures used in bridging bone defects: (1) whole fibular transplants,1j (2) dual onlay tibial grafts1j and (3) the most recent technic developed by Flanagan and Burem, opposing massive hemicylindrical grafts taken from the affected bone, used especially in reconstructing defects of the tibia and the femur.3 This procedure is

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