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Article
March 1951

EFFECT OF ADRENOXYL ON BLOOD LOSS FROM SURGICAL WOUNDS

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the Department of Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;62(3):420-427. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250030426010
Abstract

IT WAS demonstrated by W. B. Cannon1 in 1914 that intravenous or subcutaneous injection of small amounts of epinephrine would shorten the coagulation time of blood by one half to two thirds. He also observed that after large doses of epinephrine there was first a lengthening and later a shortening of coagulation time. Stimulation of the splanchnic nerves in animals or the occurrence in man or animals of pain or of emotions such as fear and rage is capable of greatly shortening the coagulation time of blood. After Cannon many observers have demonstrated that epinephrine in large doses causes a rise of blood pressure, increases the rate of circulation and prolongs bleeding immediately after the injection and during the time of increased pressure. The hemostatic action of epinephrine is evident when the hypertension produced by it disappears and this action persists for 15 minutes to six hours. The hemostatic

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