[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1951

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CONTACT-COMPRESSION FACTOR IN BONE SURGERY

Author Affiliations

GALVESTON, TEXAS
From the Department of Surgery, Orthopedic Division, Department of Anatomy, University of Texas School of Medicine.; Professor of Orthopedic Surgery (Dr. Eggers); Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery (Dr. Ainsworth): Resident in Orthopedic Surgery (Dr. Shindler); Professor of Cytology (Dr. Pomerat).

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;62(4):467-474. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250030475002
Abstract

THE TREATMENT of fractures by the application of methods and principles thought to be concomitant with the physiology of bone repair has created many divergent opinions. The disagreement is the result of the many complexities involved in securing osseous union. Bone is one of the few body structures which for normal function requires the reconstruction of the cellular detail present in the normal mature structure. The usual healing of many of the so-called soft tissues is by fibrous tissue. The healing of bone is accomplished my metaplasia of the anaplastic cells, with mineral depositions forming a structure identical to the original bone in character and constitutional elements. This complex process is influenced by many factors, chemical and physical, about which we must learn more.

The importance of the physical forces in fracture healing was impressed in our experiences when over a period of years many ununited fractures were examined. The

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×