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Article
May 1951

EFFECT OF VAGOTOMY AND SUBTOTAL GASTRIC RESECTION ON THE SECRETION OF MUCIN IN THE HUMAN STOMACH

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the departments of medicine and surgery of the New York Medical College, Flower and Fifth Avenue Hospitals.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;62(5):658-669. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250030668006
Abstract

CONSIDERABLE work has been done studying the effects of subtotal gastric resection on the secretion of acid and pepsin in the human stomach, and the results of these studies are generally known. Attention has been directed in recent years to the effects of bilateral vagotomy in human beings on the secretion of hydrochloric acid,1 especially after the development of the insulin test for evaluation of the continuity of the vagus nerves.2 The effect of combined procedures (vagotomy plus partial gastric resection) also has been studied,3 as well as the effect of these procedures on the secretion of gastric pepsin.4

The effect of these operative procedures on the secretion of gastric mucin and its various fractions is practically unknown. The fragmentary data available are based exclusively on the crude visual estimation of gastric mucin, by direct observation through gastric fistula,5 or during gastroscopy,6 either in the gastric juice or on the

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