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Article
June 1951

SURGICAL TREATMENT OF FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine and the Medical Center.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;62(6):833-846. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250030844011
Abstract

A POLYP or polypus is a smooth and pedunculated growth arising from a mucous surface; the word has its origin in the Greek adjective "polus" meaning "many" and "pous" meaning "foot." Adenomatosis may be defined as a condition in which glandular tissue becomes the seat of exuberant overgrowths and which has as its origin the Greek words "aden" meaning "gland" and "oma" meaning "tumor." Let me emphasize the fact at the onset (as many others have done) that the term "polyposis" or "adenomatosis" should be used to describe the condition under consideration in that each implies the multiplicity of the lesions.

Guptill1 and later Hoxworth and Slaughter2 have collected the pertinent historical facts concerning familial polyposis of the colon. Briefly they include the first report of this condition by Menzel in 1721, a second description of the condition in a 30 year old woman in 1861 and the

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