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Article
July 1951

LIMITATIONS OF SURGERY IN THE TREATMENT OF MALIGNANT DISEASES

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;63(1):2-3. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250040005002

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Abstract

THE PRESENT situation in regard to the treatment of malignancy is far from satisfactory. Our resources consist chiefly of surgical removal and exposure to radiant energy in various forms. Neither of these methods is always applicable, and certainly neither is always successful. In fact, one of the greatest problems confronting medical science is the discovery of a better attack on malignant disease. The inadequacy of current surgical procedures in many cases has stimulated efforts to secure better results by an extension of the magnitude and compass of the operative attack. Such extension has become more feasible with the development of supportive and rehabilitative measures such as improved understanding of blood chemistry, the free use of whole blood transfusions, and the increased safety of prolonged anesthesia. This combination of a desire for better results and the possibility of executing more radical attacks has resulted in the accomplishment of drastic destructive operations

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