[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1951

FEMORAL ARTERIOVENOUS ANASTOMOSIS IN THE TREATMENT OF OCCLUSIVE ARTERIAL DISEASE

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Department of Surgery of the Henry Ford Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;63(4):435-451. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250040445003
Abstract

THE ULTIMATE theoretical aim of a surgically created femoral arteriovenous anastomosis in the treatment of peripheral obliterative arterial disease is to provide an unobstructed system of vascular channels for the transportation of arterial blood by substituting the venous vascular bed for the diseased arterial tree distal to the shunt through the diversion of the arterial blood into the venous pathways of the limb.

This concept is old, and from 1881 to 1916 its practical applicability was extensively investigated both clinically1 and experimentally.2 After 1916 the operation of therapeutic femoral arteriovenous shunt gradually lost its popularity, and between that year and the year 1948 it is rarely cited in the literature.3 Indeed, it had been virtually forgotten as a practical surgical procedure when in 1949 it was revived by Jordan and Johnston4 in this country and by Leger5 in France.

In the past the clinical and

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×