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Article
October 1951

SLOW VERSUS RAPID INTESTINAL STRANGULATION OBSTRUCTION

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;63(4):511-519. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250040521012
Abstract

OUR EXPERIMENTS were undertaken to investigate the phenomenon of slow intestinal strangulation, to compare it with that of rapid intestinal strangulation, and to observe the effects of a combination of the two. There has been a paucity of experimental investigation along these lines despite the fact that these phenomena undoubtedly occur in one combination or another in strangulation obstructions in the human. To the best of our knowledge, the only work directly applicable to this problem is that of Goldman.1 In 1943 he reported an experiment in dogs in which a loop of ileum was stretched over a taut string. This produced venous stasis and edema in the loop, and arterial pulsations ceased after some three or four hours. Gaseous distention as determined by roentgenologic studies was absent in 25% of the animals either in the involved loop or in the proximal ileum.

EXPERIMENTAL DATA 

Rapid Strangulation; Control Series. 

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