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Article
October 1951

NEW NEEDLE FOR USE WITH WIRE SUTURE MATERIAL

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Temple University School of Medicine and Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;63(4):583-584. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250040595021
Abstract

ALLOY steel wire as a suture material was introduced to the medical profession by Dr. W. Wayne Babcock in 1934.1 It has attained wide popularity among surgeons because it is completely nonirritating, and its tensile strength is great. However, there is one annoying disadvantage to its use. This is the tendency for the twisted knot to slide down the side of the ordinary needle and to rip tissues as the needle is pulled through. Attempts have been made to correct this disadvantage. The use of atraumatic needles with the wire fixed into the needle is satisfactory but expensive. Braided wire has been tried and has proved much more flexible and usable than ordinary wire, and the twisted base tends to be smaller, but again the ends tend to fray and the expense is increased.

We have recently devised a needle which overcomes this disadvantage of alloy steel wire while

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