[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1951

SOME STUDIES ON CLOTTING ACTIVITY OF EXTRACTS OF NORMAL AND DISEASED TISSUES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
Dr. Blaustein is Chief of the Division of Hematology, Gouverneur Hospital, New York, and the Laboratory of the Bayonne Hospital, Bayonne, N. J.; Dr. Huber is Resident in Surgery, New York Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital, New York.

AMA Arch Surg. 1951;63(5):592-598. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1951.01250040606003
Abstract

COMPONENTS of the coagulation mechanism have been and are being extensively investigated in relation to the development of thrombosis. Most recently, Ochsner and his associates1 have demonstrated the lowering of circulating anti-thrombin postoperatively, and they feel that this may play a role in the development of postoperative thrombosis. McFarlane2 feels that trauma may cause extensive damage to tissues and blood vessels, with inevitable absorption of thromboplastin and thrombin. Ochsner1 states that a predisposing factor to phlebothrombosis is the increased coagulability of the blood which occurs in persons subjected to tissue trauma. He further states that, whatever the cause, tissue damage results in blood changes which increase the coagulability of blood. Allen, Barker, and Hines3 observed that postoperative thrombophlebitis is commonest after procedures in which considerable tissue is removed and in which there is likely to be a great amount of tissue injury. Mason and Harrison4

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×