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Article
January 1952

SHOCK THERAPY WITH INTRAPERITONEAL INFUSION OF BLOOD VOLUME REPLENISHERS, DEXTRAN AND PVP

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(1):80-91. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010091011
Abstract

ANIMAL experimentation1 has established the fact that certain fluids, such as glucose or isotonic sodium chloride solution, are absorbed and well tolerated when administered by drip intraperitoneally. Subsequently, the efficacy of this method of administration of fluids was substantiated in a clinical study.2 The growing interest in so-called plasma substitutes suggested the question of whether they also could be introduced intraperitoneally.

In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that in the event of a great military or civilian catastrophe the stockpiles of whole blood and plasma may not suffice and that there is an urgent need for other agents capable of replenishing the depleted stores of body fluids. The terms "plasma substitute" or "plasma expander" applied to such substances are misnomers, objectionable from the theoretical as well as the practical point of view. They are misnomers because, in contradistinction to plasma, such agents are deprived of certain

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