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Article
January 1952

TRAUMATIC RUPTURE OF THE BODY OF THE PSOAS MUSCLE

Author Affiliations

FRAMINGHAM, MASS.; BOSTON
From the Surgical Service of the Framingham Union Hospital and the Department of Surgery of the Boston University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(1):119-123. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010130016
Abstract

TRAUMATIC rupture of the body of the psoas muscle has been known for centuries, the first recorded case having been reported by Galen, who observed the injury in a Roman gladiator.1 Despite this fact, relatively few cases are recorded in the medical literature and the clinical picture, which is characteristic, is not widely known. To the uninitiated the symptom complex is confusing, and the resulting errors in diagnosis may lead to unnecessary operations and to avoidable deformities. The purpose of this paper is to report a case in which this unusual accident occurred and to emphasize the diagnostic pitfalls that were encountered.

REPORT OF A CASE  A 15-year-old white schoolboy was admitted to the Framingham Union Hospital on April 1, 1947, complaining of pain in the right hip. Ten days prior to his admission he noted the onset of an intermittent, mild, aching sensation in the right groin.

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