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Article
March 1952

REDUCTION IN ELEVATED CEREBROSPINAL FLUID PRESSURE BY ARTIFICIAL KIDNEYExperiments on Acute Overhydration in Renal Insufficiency

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(3):365-372. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010379011
Abstract

THE THERAPY of acute renal failure, with the possibility of reversing an outwardly hopeless situation by readjustment of the body fluids and electrolytes, is a fascinating problem. This problem is the more demanding of a solution because acute renal insufficiency can so often occur in patients whose outlook is otherwise excellent. The etiology of the so-called uremic syndrome has not been definitely proved, but the occurrence of fluid overloading is frequent.1 On the assumption that pulmonary and cerebral edema play an important role, this work was undertaken to determine the efficiency of extracorporeal dialysis in the therapy of this particular ramification of the problem of the uremic syndrome.

Preliminary reports of Kolff2 and Alwall3 were available at the beginning of our work, and we are indebted to them for their pioneer efforts. The apparatus of Alwall, with a few minor modifications, was used because of its simplicity

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