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Article
April 1952

ANTERIOR HERNIATION OF A RUPTURED LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISKComments on the Diagnostic Value of the Diskogram

Author Affiliations

HONOLULU, HAWAII

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(4):457-463. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010473005
Abstract

THE TRAUMATIC rupture of a lumbar intervertebral disk with posterior herniation of portions of the disk into the spinal canal has long been recognized as the cause of the clinical syndrome characterized by low back pain and unilateral sciatica.1 Operations for such conditions as "ruptured disk," "slipped disk," or "herniated nucleus pulposus" have become in recent years even commoner and more frequently encountered than appendectomies in many hospitals throughout the country. Surgical treatment for the disk syndrome, however, is seldom recommended without objective evidence of nerve root involvement, manifest by sciatic radiation, intensification on movement of the spine, sensory disturbance, and diminished reflex activity at the ankle. In the majority of cases these findings are considered essential criteria for the recommendation of surgery.

Little attention has been given to the possibility of surgical treatment for a ruptured lumbar intervertebral disk which has not herniated into the spinal canal. The

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