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Article
May 1952

CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES TO ACUTE LIGATION OF PORTAL VEIN

Author Affiliations

DENVER
From the Departments of Surgery and Physiology, and the Halsted Surgical Laboratory, of the University of Colorado Medical Center.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(5):665-680. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010683016
Abstract

THE PRESENT study is the outgrowth of attempts to produce a form of portal hypertension in the dog which is consistent with that seen in man. It was observed that chronic occlusion of the portal vein in the dog did not result in a consistent elevation of the portal venous pressure. These initial studies were made in unanesthetized animals with pressures taken through a No. 19 needle inserted via a previously placed London cannula. It was found that nearly complete occlusion was required before a significant elevation of portal pressure could be produced in the acute preparation. Gradual occlusion over a two- to three-week period stimulated sufficient collateral circulation to allow complete occlusion without death of the animal. These studies were confirmed in the report before this meeting last year by Douglass, Mehn, Lounsbury, Swigert, and Tanturi.1 They have recently been again confirmed by Morris and Miller.2

Since

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