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Article
June 1952

INFLUENCE OF HEPATIC ARTERY LIGATION ON REGENERATION OF LIVER TISSUE IN THE RAT

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO
From the Department of Surgery, Edward J. Meyer Memorial Hospital, and the University of Buffalo School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(6):783-787. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010803009
Abstract

WHEN DOGS or rats are subjected to partial hepatectomy at repeated intervals, the remaining liver increases in bulk to replace the deficit. If one-fifth to three-fourths of a dog's liver is removed, the remaining part regenerates completely in from six to eight weeks. Similarly a rat liver will resume its previous size in 14 to 16 days following partial removal. It often happens that the restored liver weighs more than the original organ. According to Markowitz,1 the remaining part of the liver responds as rapidly and completely after the second or third partial hepatectomy as after the first.

The cause of hepatic restoration may possibly be the relatively increased blood supply, since after operation blood from the portal vein and the hepatic artery traverses a smaller mass of tissue. In a paper on the relation of portal blood flow to liver maintenance, Rous and Larimore2 pointed out the

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