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Article
June 1952

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF HETEROTOPIC PANCREAS IN WALL OF STOMACHReport of a Case and Review of the Literature

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE
From Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of General Surgery, and Marquette University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;64(6):840-846. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260010860016
Abstract

NO MATTER how rare a medical entity may be, if it has the potentiality of producing any serious consequence, it certainly is worthy of consideration. Since Klob1 first called attention to the aberrant pancreas, in 1859, there have been 548 cases of heterotopic pancreatic tissue reported in the literature.

There are numerous contributions as to the origin of this tissue. The one most widely accepted is that of Moore2 who suggests that different cases present different factors of possible origin: (1) that the heterotopic tissue develops from the primary anlage; (2) that inflammatory or embryonal adhesions cause subsequent detachments of a mass of pancreatic cells, and (3) that the cells of the secondary snared-off anlage of Warthin are still undifferentiated entoderm and are capable of differentiating into pancreatic acini, islands of Langerhans, ductal epithelium, and glands of Brunner.

Heterotopic pancreatic tissue has been noted in the stomach, gall

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