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Article
August 1952

RESECTION OF THE LIVER FOR CARCINOMA

Author Affiliations

SALT LAKE CITY

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(2):337-341. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020350017
Abstract

MOST TUMORS of the liver are secondary lesions representing either direct invasions from malignant conditions in adjacent organs or metastases from more distant lesions. It has been customary to consider liver involvement as evidence of hopelessness of the patient's condition. Under these circumstances, the liver is usually left alone, and the primary growth is attacked, if at all, only with an idea of palliation. There are some cases, however, in which it is possible to resect not only the primary tumor and its regional lymphatics, but also the secondary extension to the liver as well. It is true that operations on the liver carry special hazards due to blood loss, air embolism, and biliary fistulae, but the problems presented are neither insolvable nor is the operation itself necessarily dangerous. A heroic effort of this sort may be justified occasionally if it appears to offer the hopeless patient a reasonably good

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