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Article
September 1952

EXPERIMENTAL METHOD FOR AN EVERTING END-TO-END ANASTOMOSIS IN THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Department of Research Surgery, Harper Hospital and Herman Kiefer Hospital, and Department of Surgery, Wayne University College of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(3):398-405. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020412007
Abstract

IN WORK done previously in our laboratory on the blood supply of the esophagus, approximately 25% of the dogs on which resections were made were seen to retch on solid food two weeks after conventional esophageal anastomoses.1 In later attempts to transplant sections of viable intestine and other tissues into surgical defects in the esophagus the regurgitation of food and fluid was such a prominent feature of the postoperative course that resultant malnutrition usually jeopardized the end-result. The edema and induration often persisted with a high degree of temporary stenosis for 10 to 14 days. It is largely for this reason that many surgeons rely on the weaker, more time-consuming side-to-side anastomosis in small-bowel resections. The conventional anastomosis occasionally presents the surgeon with a serious complication elsewhere, in the form of the nonfunctioning anastomosis.

These problems prompted a review of suture and anastomotic techniques in the hope that a

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