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Article
September 1952

RISK OF URGENT SURGERY IN PRESENCE OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ANGINA PECTORIS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Departments of Surgery and Medicine of the Presbyterian Hospital, and the Department of Surgery of the Research and Educational Hospitals, University of Illinois.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(3):448-456. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020462012
Abstract

GENERALLY it is conceded that a greater operative risk attends the patient with coronary disease than is faced by the person with a normal heart. The mortality rate in surgical patients with myocardial infarction has been variously reported1 from 5.2 to 44.5%. The unrelenting progress of medical science reflected in the increased life span necessarily brings to the surgeon a greater number of elderly patients with degenerative cardiac changes. Among these patients are those with evidence of severe angina pectoris or myocardial infarction harboring coexistent disease requiring urgent surgery. Usually these patients have some painful or malignant process in which delays in surgical therapeusis are costly, inviting reduced survival rates or even denying significant prolongation of a pain-free existence. In essence, the earliest auspicious application of a definitive operation designed to obviate these undesirable elements is implied by the term "urgent surgery." In most instances the operation is of

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