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Article
November 1952

EXPERIMENTAL RENAL TRANSPLANTATION: I. EFFECT OF NITROGEN MUSTARD, CORTISONE, AND SPLENECTOMY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery (Division of Urology), University of Chicago, The School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(5):702-705. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020694008
Abstract

ON THE basis of existing evidence the cause for failure of renal transplantation is due to the host developing antibodies in response to the foreign protein of the graft. This immune process is not only a natural phenomenon but also a valuable protective biological reaction. The present paper is concerned with methods of modifying or depressing this renal antigen-antibody response by use of nitrogen mustard (methyl bis [β-chloroethyl] amine hydrochloride), cortisone, and splenectomy. Philips, Hopkins, and Freeman,1 and others2 have demonstrated that nitrogen mustard will suppress development of antibodies. Germuth and co-workers3 have shown that cortisone is effective for states of hypersensitivity. Rich and co-workers4 have indicated also that cortisone inhibits antigen-antibody reactions. Persky and Jacob,5 however, failed to note any increased survival of renal transplantation in the cortisone-treated dog. The role of the spleen in the development of antibodies has been explored. After intravenous

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