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Article
December 1952

ION-EXCHANGE RESINS AS ADJUNCTS IN TREATMENT OF HIGH INTESTINAL FISTULAEClinical and Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS; NEW YORK
Dr. Stephenson is now at New York University-Bellevue Medical Center, New York.; From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, and Barnes Hospital, St. Louis.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(6):871-875. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020865011
Abstract

THE PURPOSE of this paper is to report our experiences in the use of ion-exchange resins in the treatment of high intestinal fistulae and the results of some experimental work on the antitryptic activity of these substances. Because polyamine-formaldehyde anion-exchange resins have been reported to have an inhibitory effect on tryptic enzyme activity,1 it occurred to us that these resins might be of use in reducing the cutaneous excoriation accompanying gastric, duodenal, and high jejunal fistulae.

INTRODUCTION  In 1945 Segal2 first suggested the use of anion-exchange resins in the treatment of peptic ulcer. He found that these substances reduced gastric acidity by absorbing free hydrochloric acid and mitigating the activity of the tryptic enzymes of the stomach by altering the pH of the medium. Martin and Wilkinson1 later found that anion-exchange resins deactivated 80% of the gastric pepsin when they were mixed with a solution of gastric

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