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Article
December 1952

PARTIAL OCCLUSION OF THE PORTAL VEIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ASCITES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(6):886-893. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020880014
Abstract

A PRELIMINARY report of our study of the reciprocal hydrostatic relationship between the portal and caval systems was published recently.1 The present report is concerned with the specific effects of partial occlusion of the portal vein on the formation and re-formation of experimental ascites caused by partial occlusion of the vena cava in the dog.

Of the several methods employed in the past to produce ascites in the dog, partial occlusion of the inferior vena cava above the diaphragm produces ascites most closely mimicking that seen following hepatic cirrhosis in the human. Sudden complete occlusion of the hepatic veins in the dog will result in death in from 10 to 60 minutes.2 Partial blockage of the hepatic veins is difficult to accomplish in the dog because these veins are numerous and short. However, congestion of the liver and ascites can be produced consistently in two to three weeks

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