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Article
December 1952

PANCREATIC CYST: AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF HYPERSPLENISM

Author Affiliations

NEWINGTON, CONN.
From the Department of Surgery and Pathology, Veterans Administration Hospital, Newington, Conn., and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn.; Chief of Surgical Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Newington, Conn.; Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine (Dr. Hurwitz); Chief of Laboratory Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Newington, Conn.; Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine (Dr. Yesner).

AMA Arch Surg. 1952;65(6):933-936. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1952.01260020927021
Abstract

HYPERSPLENISM, first described by Wiseman and Doan,1 includes a variety of hematologic syndromes which can be attributed to overactivity of the spleen. The spleen has three major functions: the destruction of red blood cells, the storage of blood, and the production of lymphocytes from the lymphoid elements in the organ. In hypersplenism, there may exist a diminution in any of the cellular elements of the blood. The patient may exhibit findings consistent with neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, or anemia, either singly, or in combination, or all three together.2 The etiologic factors enumerated by Dameshek3 in a study of 28 cases included rheumatoid arthritis, syphilis, cirrhosis of the liver, Gaucher's disease, Boeck's sarcoid, malaria, and Hodgkin's disease, and 16 were classified as idiopathic. The diagnosis is based on the cytopenia associated with a normal or hyperfunctioning bone marrow, and in the case of anemia, with no obvious cause of blood

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