[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.180.70. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1953

INTRAVENOUS TRYPSIN IN THE TREATMENT OF THROMBOTIC PHENOMENA

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;66(4):552-561. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260030567024
Abstract

THE FIBRINOLYTIC properties of trypsin have been known for some time. Recently, Innerfield and his associates1 reported that under certain conditions of administration and dosage the enzyme could be given intravenously to animals and to patients without untoward effects. These workers stated that the intravenous administration of trypsin caused the dissolution of thrombi and also caused a remarkable subsidence of a variety of acute inflammatory conditions. For many years investigators interested in the the thrombosis problem have sought a nontoxic in vivo thrombolytic agent. Therefore the claims of Innerfield's group warrant serious investigation.

We wish to report our clinical experiences with 30 cases of acute and chronic peripheral thrombotic disease and to summarize some preliminary data from our animal studies.

CLINICAL EXPERIENCES 

Dose.  —Innerfield and his group recommended a dose of 100,000 to 250,000 units of crystalline trypsin2 diluted in 250 cc. of saline once or twice a

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×