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Article
June 1953

STUDIES OF THE REEXPANDED LUNG AFTER PROLONGED ATELECTASIS

Author Affiliations

SANATORIUM, MISS.; ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, and the Chest Surgical Service, Barnes Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;66(6):801-809. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260030821011
Abstract

AFTER reviewing the experience with traumatic rupture of the bronchus,1 our interest was aroused as to the possibility of reinstituting function in the atelectatic lung. We noted, contrary to the usual assumption, that in not a single case with complete stenosis of the main-stem bronchus for periods up to 26 years had suppurative disease of the atelectatic lung developed. In the few cases with partial stenosis secondary to the traumatic rupture, secondary bronchiectasis had developed. Holinger and his associates2 report on a patient who had excision of the atelectatic lung three years after complete occlusion of the bronchus. There was no gross or microscopic evidence of infection or morphologic change which might be incompatible with reestablishment of respiratory and circulatory function. Hodes, Johnson, and Atkins3 similarly present photomicrographs of a lung resected after at least three months of atelectasis in which fibrosis, bronchiectasis, or degenerative vascular changes

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