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Article
June 1953

SURGICAL ASPECTS OF CHRONIC DUODENAL ULCERS OF CHILDHOODReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

MINOT, N. D.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;66(6):827-845. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260030847014
Abstract

CHRONIC peptic ulcer of childhood is similar in all respects to its counterpart in adult life so far as its gross and microscopic appearance is concerned. Scar tissue is a constant and prominent feature of the disease, although it is not found in the acute type which constitutes the vast majority of peptic ulcers seen in infancy and childhood. The latter, when purely destructive as they frequently are, may be unaccompanied by any inflammatory reaction whatsoever, and, at most, evidence of scar tissue is always minimal and insignificant.

Clinically, too, the acute ulcer stands in sharp contrast with the chronic type, since its course is characteristically short. Usually healing occurs promptly, or disaster results with a most surprising suddenness—sometimes within a few hours from the time of onset and apparently due to hemorrhage or perforation. In exceptional instances its course is prolonged, even to the extent that it may become

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