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Article
June 1953

SYMPTOMATIC BLIND POUCH FOLLOWING LATERAL ANASTOMOSIS OF INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

ALBUQUERQUE, N. MEX.
Dr. Williamson died June 2, 1952.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;66(6):878-883. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260030898018
Abstract

VARIOUS observations relative to the occurrence of macrocytic anemia, intestinal obstruction, borborygmus, diarrhea, bowel ulceration and malnutrition were recorded coincident with the early growth of gastrointestinal surgery, but the pathogenesis of these ills were speculative at best. As early as 1897, Faber1 associated a macrocytic anemia with stricture, and in 1906, Cannon and Murphy2 reported roentgenologic evidence that in cats the proximal segment of a lateral anastomosis failed to empty well if the blind ends extended beyond the anastomotic opening. In 1924 Seyderhelm,3 in Germany, described "pernicious anemia" in dogs consequent to the production of strictures of the small intestine just above the cecum using strips of aponeurosis. Tönnis and Brusis4 also produced a macrocytic, hyperchromic anemia in dogs but by another method, namely, the production of a 50 cm. cul-de-sac in the small intestine. Surgical excision of the culde-sac resulted in restoration of the hemogram

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