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Article
July 1953

EXPERIMENTAL GASTROJEJUNAL ULCERS PRODUCED BY REVERSING THE DUODENUM

Author Affiliations

KALAMAZOO, MICH.; DETROIT

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;67(1):23-28. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260040026004
Abstract

MANY SURGICAL and chemical methods for producing ulcers in animals have been developed, but all of these preparations have had certain disadvantages.1 None has been entirely satisfactory for studying the peptic ulcer problem in man.

All of the chemically produced ulcers, such as those caused by cinchophen and histamine in beeswax, are unsatisfactory for testing antiulcer preparations because of the theoretical drug antagonisms developing between the chemical producing the ulcer and the compound being tested.

The surgically produced ulcers also have their drawbacks. Many of them do not occur in a sufficiently high percentage of cases to make the results derived from their use of any statistical value. The Mann-Williamson preparation, consisting of an internal duodenal fistula, allows only the terminal 12 in. (30.4 cm.) of ileum to act as an absorbing area for digested food, as the entire jejunum and ileum proximal to this receive no pancreatic juice

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