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Article
November 1953

CEREBRAL ARTERIOGRAPHY WITH SODIUM ACETRIZOATE (UROKON SODIUM) 30%

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From Washington University School of Medicine.; The Edward Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (Dr. Seaman); Department of Surgery, Division of Neurological Surgery (Dr. Schwartz).

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;67(5):741-745. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260040752012
Abstract

THE FIRST use in this country of iodopyracet (Diodrast) for cerebral arteriography was reported by Gross1 in 1940. The procedure has been used with increasing frequency to visualize cerebral circulation in many conditions, particularly in patients suspected of harboring intracranial aneurysms and tumors. Although this substance is relatively safe, the occasional occurrence of untoward reactions has been reported. Engeset2 described two fatalities in a series of 100 patients but did not believe that death was primarily due to angiography. In 1949, Chusid, Robinson, and Margules-Lavergne,3 in a report to the New York Society of Neurosurgery, noted two instances of transient hemiplegia following intracarotid injection of 35% iodopyracet, and 21 similar complications were mentioned in the discussion following this paper. Since then, other reports have been published.4

In searching for a substance of less toxicity, we thought the results of our preliminary clinical trials5 with sodium

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