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Article
December 1953

INTUSSUSCEPTION IN THE ADULT, WITH EMPHASIS ON RETROGRADE TYPE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Surgical Service, Presbyterian Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;67(6):854-864. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260040867007
Abstract

SOME UNUSUAL cases of intussusception in adults have been encountered in the past 20 years at Presbyterian Hospital in New York. Since intussusception in the adult produces signs and symptoms differing from those seen in infants, an analysis of 40 cases from the surgical service is presented. All the cases have been well documented by clinical or pathological laboratory findings. Among the patients having exploration were those in whom laparotomy revealed that the invagination had been reduced. In the latter cases x-ray studies diagnostic of intussusception, as well as gross and microscopic pathological findings, were considered sufficient for their inclusion in this study.

INCIDENCE  Intussusception in the adult appears to be an uncommon disorder, a fact which is borne out by a review of the literature. It has been estimated that, of all intussusceptions, the incidence in adults is about 5%.1 Perrin and Lindsay2 noted 18 cases of

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