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Article
December 1953

MAINTAINING VIABILITY OF AN EXTREMITY WITH ACUTELY OBSTRUCTED ARTERIAL CIRCULATIONArterial Autoperfusion Method: Preliminary Report

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine (Dr. Green).; From the Cardiovascular Department, Medical Research Institute, and the Department of Surgery, Michael Reese Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1953;67(6):875-877. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260040888009
Abstract

THE FREQUENCY of loss of limb because of embolic occlusion is substantially high, due either to inability or failure to counteract the ill effects resulting therefrom. Also, the chance for survival following restoration of the circulation after embolectomy depends upon the length of time the extremity has been deprived of its blood supply. Since the ill effects of embolic occlusion (ischemia and gangrene) are primarily due to the absence of adequate blood supply peripherally, it seemed a fundamental concept that if oxygenated blood could be supplied to the limb peripheral to the embolus the limb should survive.

Since the fundamental concept is to supply oxygenated blood to that part which has been denied it and thus "restore" the circulation, the autoperfusion of arterial blood from an upper extremity into an artery peripheral to the embolus suggested itself. This procedure would thus establish a circuit of arterial blood. It is intended

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