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Article
April 1954

SURGICAL TREATMENT OF CHRONIC ULCERATIVE COLITISThe Skin-Grafted Ileac Stoma

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
Section of Surgery, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation (Dr. Black), and Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Foundation (Dr. Sholl).

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;68(4):454-462. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01260050456008
Abstract

IT IS NOW rather generally agreed that the only definitive surgical treatment of chronic ulcerative colitis is the formation of an ileac stoma and resection of the intestine including the terminal ileum, colon, and rectum. Marked progress has been made, particularly during the past few years, in reducing the risk associated with the surgical procedures. In our opinion, use of the skin-grafted ileac stoma has solved several of the problems associated with stomas of the usual type. For reasons that are not entirely clear, skin-grafted stomas have not been widely accepted. Emphasis instead has been placed recently on increased safety of surgical treatment and the virtues of appliances which are cemented to the skin.1 Presumably then, surgical treatment and the management of the ileac stoma have become so satisfactory that surgical treatment seems warranted in a far greater proportion of cases. This presumption seems untenable to us, essentially because

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