[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.168.87. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1954

ROLE OF RADICAL SURGERY IN EXTENSIVE AND RECURRENT MALIGNANT LESIONS OF THE FACE AND SCALP

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the Divison of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, and Duke Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;68(5):677-686. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01260050679014
Abstract

THE ROLE of radical surgery in the treatment of cancer is well established. The literature contains many examples of the application of this principle in the therapy of malignant lesions considered inoperable only a few years ago. With the tremendous forward strides in anesthesia, fluid-balance, and antibiotic therapy, older patients are tolerating more and more radical procedures, designed to eradicate both the local and distant effects of malignant disease. The criteria of operability have widened, not only in regard to the size, extent, and location of the lesion, but also in regard to the associated physiological disabilities of the geriatric patient. These may be completely unrelated to his malignant disease, such as cardiovascular or renal insufficiency. Martin3 quotes Dr. Jules Abels as saying, "There are no medical contraindications to cancer surgery."

Radical surgery, however, has been largely limited to those malignant growths arising in the abdominal, thoracic, and oral

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×