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Article
May 1954

PATHOGENESIS OF ACUTE RENAL INSUFFICIENCY SEEN IN SURGICAL PATIENTSExperimental Evaluation of Certain Factors: A Résumé

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Mayo Foundation and the Mayo Clinic. Dr. Block, Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Foundation; Dr. Wakim, Section of Physiology, and Dr. Mann, Emeritus Member, Division of Experimental Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation. The Mayo Foundation is a part of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;68(5):693-704. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01260050695016
Abstract

SEVERE oliguria or anuria in surgical patients is of grave significance, for it indicates a serious illness and, if it is the consequence of organic renal damage, severe disturbance to the most important machinery for the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. We have obtained more information concerning the pathogenic factors in the etiology of acute renal failure as encountered in surgical patients by experimentally evaluating individually those factors considered most likely to be involved. The purpose of this communication is to present the conclusions and concepts derived from these studies and to correlate them with the reports of other investigators.

PROLONGED HYPOTENSION AND SHOCK  It is well recognized that severe hypotension will reduce renal function and urine flow, inasmuch as renal function is so intimately dependent on blood flow, pressure, and other hemodynamic factors. However, renal function usually recovers rapidly on restoration of a normal blood

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