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Article
June 1954

POLYVINYL AND SILICONE COMPOUNDS AS SUBCUTANEOUS PROSTHESESLaboratory and Clinical Investigation

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Service, Washington University School of Medicine.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;68(6):744-751. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01260050746003
Abstract

INVESTIGATIONS of foamed polyvinyl alcohol sponge, of multicellular polyvinyl chloride sponge, and of silicone compounds for use as subcutaneous prostheses in plastic surgery have been reported,* and studies of their tolerance by living tissues are being continued, as outlined below. To lend correlation with earlier reports, items from them are included here.

Deformities and abnormal contour anatomy, resulting from loss and distortion of bone, soft tissue, and cartilage, present a major problem in plastic and maxillofacial surgery, and the development of satisfactory subcutaneous prostheses is one of the greatest needs. The wide variety of substances, homogeneous, heterogeneous, foreign organic, metallic, and synthetic, that have been used to try to improve these defects is an indication that search for more satisfactory replacements should be continued. All subcutaneous prostheses should be inert in the tissue, light, resilient, have ease of workability, and should not produce tumor. Preferably, there should be prostheses of

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