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Article
June 1954

SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF ULCERATIVE STASIS DISEASE OF THE LOWER EXTREMITIES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine; the Vascular-Surgical Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Hines, Ill., and the Cardiovascular Surgical Service, St. Luke's Hospital, Chicago.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;68(6):757-768. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01260050759005
Abstract

THE OUTSTANDING features of ulcerative stasis disease as it affects the lower extremities are the tendency to swell, the development of incompetent or varicose superficial veins, and the changes which occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the stasis areas on the medial and lateral aspects of the lower third of the leg. The edema is ascribable to lymphatic vessel disease and to venous insufficiency, either or both factors being present in varying degrees in individual cases. Unless there have occurred repeated episodes of inflammation, the lymphatic element ordinarily diminishes with time. It is at its greatest severity in the early period following the acute thrombophlebitis to which it is an accessory. The venous element of the stasis arises either from permanent occlusion of the deep veins of the extremity or to the tendency for reflux venous flow in a vien which has been rendered valveless by the original

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