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Article
August 1954

SKIN-LINED OMENTUM AND PLASTIC SPONGE TUBES FOR EXPERIMENTAL CHOLEDOCHODUODENOSTOMY

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section of Surgery (Dr. ReMine) and the Section of Surgical Research (Dr. Grindlay) of the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation. The Mayo Foundation is a part of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;69(2):255-262. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270020121014
Abstract

STRICTURES of the common bile duct remain among the most perplexing problems confronting the surgeon. The history of one or more previous operations on the biliary tract in a patient who has jaundice, acholic stools, and dark urine is certainly one that will test the ingenuity of the surgeon at the time of operation.

The problem of reconstruction of the common bile duct to relieve the obstructive lesion and restore the patient to a normal physiologic state has stimulated numerous investigators to attempt a variety of methods of alleviating this situation.* McCorriston and MacKenzie3 utilized split-thickness and full-thickness skin grafts in the form of tubes implanted in the omentum of rabbits and dogs. In one animal in each group, this tube was used to convey bile from the gall bladder to the proximal portion of the jejunum. These tubes did not prove successful. Hardin and Kittle4 attempted to

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