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Article
October 1954

EFFECT OF NONSPECIFIC TRAUMA ON GASTRIC SECRETION AND ON QUIESCENT PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

LOUISVILLE
From the Department of Surgery (Dr. Drye) and the Department of Medicine (Dr. Schoen), University of Louisville School of Medicine. Mr. Ross is a Student Research Scholar aided by a grant from the Baxter Laboratories, Inc.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;69(4):450-454. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270040006003
Abstract

IN A PREVIOUS paper, we reported a series of patients who, within a few days after trauma or surgery not related to the stomach, developed serious complications of their pre-existing peptic ulcers. Stimulated by these cases, we started a study of the relationship of such trauma and surgery to gastric secretion.

In our first paper,1 we presented data showing that after duodenorrhaphy for acutely perforated duodenal ulcers, gastric secretion attained high concentrations of acids by 8 to 12 hours and maintained acid levels for the following 12 to 24 hours which were comparable to those found in a group of patients with active duodenal ulcers. No preoperative controls were available in these patients presented in the first paper.

In the present paper, we are presenting additional clinical and laboratory data on both ulcer and nonulcer patients with preoperative and postoperative control studies.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS 

Effect of Nonspecific Operations on 

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