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Article
October 1954

CEREBRAL INTRAVASCULAR PRESSURE IN CHEMICALLY INDUCED HYPOTENSION

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the Neurosurgical Division and Anesthesia Division, The Duke Hospital and Medical School; Postdoctoral Fellow, National Cancer Institute (Dr. McClure).

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;69(4):496-499. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270040052009
Abstract

PREVIOUS studies have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of measuring intravascular pressure by the introduction of a No. 27 needle, attached to appropriate amplifying and recording devices, into any cerebral vessel. By this means, intravascular arterial pressures have been secured from all components of the anterior part of the circle of Willis, from cortical vessels, and from arteriovenous anomalies. Such measurements have defined the normal intravascular pressure gradient in the carotid arterial tree and, in particular, have developed a method of serial testing at operation for the presence of adequate or inadequate cross-hemispheral circulation—that is, an objective Matas test. Other observations have been made concerning the residual intravascular pressure in components of the circle of Willis and in blind arterial segments following various intracranial and combined extracranial and intracranial clip ligations for the treatment of congenital cerebral aneurysms. Among findings pertinent to the data to be presented was the observation

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