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Article
October 1954

EXPERIENCES WITH RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY OF FEMORAL ARTERY IN ARTERIOSCLEROSIS OBLITERANS

Author Affiliations

WEST ROXBURY, MASS.
From the Veterans Administration Hospital.; Chief, Surgical Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, West Roxbury, Mass., and Lecturer on Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;69(4):582-593. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270040138019
Abstract

ALTHOUGH successful surgical reconstruction of injured arteries was not infrequently reported for many decades before World War II,* such results could in those years by no means be uniformly predicted. That operations on arterial and arteriovenous aneurysms could be expected to be followed by continuity of the artery in a majority of cases was not demonstrated until the publication of the work on the casualties resulting from that war.5 The experience of the later part of the Korean campaign with its fixed battle line allowing specialized surgical personnel access to the injured shortly after wounding marked one more important step forward by demonstrating that the majority of acute injuries to major vessels could also be successfully repaired.6

The concept of reconstruction of arteries whose functional continuity has been impaired as a result of arteriosclerosis is of more recent origin. The original impetus to perform such operations was imparted

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