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Article
November 1954

INTERNAL SUPRAVESICAL HERNIA WITH POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIP TO PREVIOUS SADDLE INJURYReport of Case with Associated Inguinal and Femoral Hernias

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Department of Surgery, Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;69(5):623-626. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270050027007
Abstract

INTERNAL supravesical hernia, a rare type, is a protrusion through the supravesical fossa. These hernias were described first by Sir Astley Cooper * in 1804. The term supravesical fossa, which is the term most widely used, was introduced by Waldeyer1 in 1874.

ANATOMY  The supravesical fossa (Fig. 1) is a triangular area bounded caudally by the reflection of the peritoneum over the dome of the bladder and laterally by the lateral umbilical folds covering the obliterated umbilical vessels; the middle umbilical fold investing the obliterated urachus in the midline divides the fossa in two. Below the peritoneal reflection is the potential space between the symphysis pubis and the bladder which is known as the prevesical space of Retzius. This space extends laterally to the outer limits of the bladder and in depth to the prostate. It is filled with areolar tissue and fat and is subject to variations in size

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