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Article
November 1954

VENOUS GANGRENE WITH THROMBOSIS OF THE INFERIOR VENA CAVAReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School.

AMA Arch Surg. 1954;69(5):732-735. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270050136023
Abstract

THE FRENCH1 have for some time considered gangrene of venous origin a rare but real entity and include it in the differential diagnosis of the causes of gangrene. The Argentinians2 have written about it, too. Standard American textbooks * on vascular diseases devote a few sentences to it, and each mentions a case of its own. Haimovici,5 in an excellent review in 1950, collected 28 cases of gangrene of an extremity due to massive venous occlusion. Since then five additional cases have been reported.† The condition is definitely uncommon but is not receiving the consideration it should in this country.

It is believed that venous gangrene is likely to have a better prognosis than arterial gangrene. The gangrenous areas are generally superficial and limited to the digits, so that conservative medical therapy—anticoagulants, antibiotics, antispasmodics, and, possibly, sympathetic block—is much more likely indicated. Because tissue loss may not be

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