[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.167.159.180. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1955

BLOOD PRESSURE IN MINUTE VESSELS OF HUMAN SKINClinical Estimation Made by the Method of Elevation and Reactive Hyperemia: II. Effects of Sympathectomy

Author Affiliations

San Francisco
From the Vascular Research Laboratory, Franklin Hospital, and the Department of Surgery, University of California School of Medicine.; Clinical Instructor in Surgery, University of California School of Medicine (Dr. Leeds); Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery, University of California School of Medicine (Dr. Freeman); Clinical Instructor in Surgery, University of California School of Medicine (Dr. Gilfillan); Research Fellow in Vascular Surgery, Franklin Hospital (Dr. Coelho).

AMA Arch Surg. 1955;70(1):25-28. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1955.01270070027006
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  THE PRONOUNCED cutaneous hyperemia upon release of a tourniquet has long been familiar to surgeons. This reaction, which is called reactive hyperemia, has been studied in detail by a number of workers, starting with Lister and including many of the outstanding names in vascular physiology. The period of hyperemia bears a definite relationship to the length of the circulatory arrest. Provided occlusion is not prolonged for more than a few minutes, the duration of the hyperemia is usually one-half to threefourths that of the arrest.1 It has been shown that the hyperemia represents the repayment of a blood flow debt which is built up during the period of arrest in the limb distal to the cuff.* The reaction is dependent upon accumulation of local metabolites during the period of arrest and upon the arterial pressure within the limb.4 The intense cutaneous hyperemia is the result of dilatation

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×