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Article
January 1955

CONSIDERATION OF TECHNIQUE OF AORTIC EMBOLECTOMYPresentation of Six Cases

Author Affiliations

New York
From the Surgical Service of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1955;70(1):52-58. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1955.01270070054010
Abstract

THE PROMISING results in valvular surgery have radically altered the outlook in rheumatic heart disease. As one consequence, the attitude toward arterial embolism, a characteristic complication, has also changed. This condition need no longer be considered an accelerated step in the downhill course of the hopeless invalid. It is, rather, an unfortunate episode which may be handled successfully in a patient who does have a chance of benefiting from subsequent cardiac surgery. In a review of more than 500 cases of mitral commissurotomy with a preoperative embolism incidence of 18.9%, Glover has observed only one questionable occurrence of cerebral embolism during a mean postoperative period of more than three years.*

The most dramatic and dangerous of all types of arterial embolism is that of lodgment at the bifurcation of the aorta. Whether the embolus remains there or slips down into the iliac vessels, the mortality is high and gangrene of

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