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Article
February 1955

BEHAVIOR OF SPLIT-THICKNESS, DERMAL, AND FULL-THICKNESS SKIN GRAFTS IN THORACIC CAVITYAn Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

Durham, N. C.
From the Department of Plastic Surgery, Duke University, School of Medicine, Duke Hospital, and Veterans Administration Hospital.

AMA Arch Surg. 1955;70(2):221-228. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1955.01270080067012
Abstract

THE USE of autogenous dermal skin grafts in clinical thoracic surgery has been reported by several investigators. In 1949, Gebauer * first recorded the use of dermal grafts for the repair of benign strictures of the trachea and bronchus. Sealy,6 in 1952, wrote of similar experiences with this type of graft in the reconstruction of portions of the trachea. The utilization of a full-thickness skin graft for the repair of a penetrating wound of the trachea was reported in 1953 by Hanner,7 and split-thickness skin grafts to cover thoracic wall defects have been reported by Pickrell and others.8

Experimental data on the growth of skin in the thorax is exceedingly limited. In 1952, Geever9 recorded the repair of diaphragmatic defects in dogs with cutis grafts. Horton and associates10 have investigated the use of skin to repair arterial defects of the thoracic and abdominal arteries in dogs.

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